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After many a rumour, a leak, and a countdown that served as a dead giveaway, Fallout 4 has finally been announced. Much like Fallout 3 and Fallout: New Vegas, it will be a first-person role-playing game set in a post-apocalyptic open-world. And much unlike the other two games, it will not make an appearance on the PlayStation 3 (PS3) and Xbox 360. It’s for PC, PS4, and Xbox One.

Bethesda, the company behind the game, released a trailer showing off the world before and post-apocalypse. The trailer has been made in-game, which means it should give you an accurate representation of what to expect when it’s out. While there’s no release date yet, Bethesda, the company behind the game said that a full reveal will happen at E3 2015.

But will it make it to India? If history is anything to go by, it would be unlikely. In the past, Fallout 3 and Fallout: New Vegas never made it to India. This is because Bethesda, the series’ publisher didn’t want to offend Indian sensibilities due to the game’s portrayal of cows. They were mutated, two-headed, and called Brahmins.

At the same time, the game was edited for sale in Australia and Japan. References to morphine and nuclear bombs were removed respectively for copies sold in these countries. Of course, the size of the Indian RPG market is much smaller. Such games sell a few hundred copies at best. Though with the startling success of The Witcher 3: Wild Hunt locally (we were told 1,500 units were brought in on PS4 and the same quantity for PC) that’s currently sold out, that might change. Even then, it’s still a small number that doesn’t warrant the extent of changes needed to make it available for India alone. E-xpress, the distributor for Bethesda was unavailable for comment.

Unless of course, Bethesda decides to make the game available in the Middle East as well. Fallout: New Vegas was banned in the UAE for gambling and sexual themes. However since the market size dwarfs that of India, localising Fallout 4 to be culturally sensitive is an option (provided the game has elements that can be modified as to pass muster with local regulations). It’s something CD Projekt RED did for The Witcher 3, what with a separate, censored edition of the game for Middle East markets. So it can’t be ruled out for India if Bethesda follow this route, making a censored edition available for the Indian market.

Either way, much like Dragon Age: Inquisition, you can expect the grey market to pick up slack when official channels fail. One way or another, getting your open-world post-apocalyptic fix shouldn’t be that much of a bother.